The Maroon

Guide to Voodoo

Cherie LeJeune

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






It’s that time of the year again. Yes, Halloween is right around the corner, but more importantly the Voodoo Music Experience is here! That means three days full of good music, tasty food and great fun. But newbies and veterans alike can always use a few pointers on how to make this year’s experience the best experience yet, and the Maroon is here to help.

WHAT TO BRING

A blanket for laying out on the lawn

An empty Camelback or other empty plastic container for water

Sunscreen and sunglasses if you head out during the day

Cash for food, band merch, art, etc.

Your ID, debit card and nothing else (clear out your wallet beforehand)

Small digital camera

A rain poncho

WHAT NOT TO BRING

Glass containers

Illegal substances

Outside food, beverages or alcohol Professional camera equipment (no detachable lenses, etc.)

Umbrellas

Coolers

FIVE TIPS ON HOW TO SURVIVE VOODOO

1. Bring cash. The festival’s not only known for its music, but for its food and art vendors as well. You might tell yourself that you won’t spend any money inside the festival, but you’ll change your mind once inside.

2. Carry a tiny pack of Kleenex in your pocket or purse. Two words: porta potties. Toilet paper isn’t always abundant.

3. Mind your belongings, always. A shocking amount of licenses, phones and wallets end up in Voodoo’s lost and found bin. Don’t let that be you.

4. Don’t rely on cell phones. Cell phone service has always been spotty at Voodoo, simply because a massive amount of people are contained within one park. If it’s crucial that you meet up with someone, make plans beforehand.

5. Expect to have your backpack or purse searched when you enter the grounds. Don’t bring anything that will get you kicked out of the festival. It’s not worth it.

CAMPING

Voodoo will be selling tickets to camp onsite for the duration of the festival this year. Buyers have three options: the “Crossroads Camping” for two, priced at $150; “Crossroad Camping” for three, priced at $200; or the “Loa Grand” package. “Loa Grand” packages have already sold out, which sold for $2500 and included four nights for two people in a pre-built safari style tent with electricity and bedding, along with backstage access to the artists. The “Crossroads Camping” includes four nights for two people on a 12×12 area where one must pitch their own tent. All camping options have access to showers, security and medical services.

TRANSPORTATION

Driving: City Park, where Voodoo takes place, is a 15 to 20 minute drive from campus. But general admission ticket holders can’t purchase parking passes from Voodoo, so driving a car to the festival isn’t a good idea. The small amount of street parking that is available always goes quickly.

Streetcar: One way to get to City Park from campus is to hop on the St. Charles Avenue streetcar line. Put in $1.50, one more quarter than usual, so that you get a transfer stub. Get off at Canal Street, and switch to one of the bright red streetcars that heads toward City Park (not one that heads toward the Cemetery – be sure to double check before you getting on, because they both use this line). Swipe your transfer stub instead of paying another $1.25.

Cab: If you’re heading to Voodoo with a group of friends and want a speedier alternative, split a cab. The ride’s quick, it comes out to around 20 dollars and cabs are easy to snag on this side of town. After the festival ends, though, be aware that you might wait in a line for up to half-an-hour just to grab a cab out.

ATTIRE

Voodoo Festival has always been associated with Halloween, and even though Voodoo doesn’t happen to fall on Oct. 31 this year, people will dress up regardless. Consider it a way to test out your costume, pre-Halloween. If you decide not to sport a costume, stay comfy and/or hipster with your clothing choices. It’s a music festival; need I say more? And if you get cold easily, tying a light jacket around your waist when you head out the door won’t be a decision you regret. Nights can often get chilly.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Since 1923 • For a greater Loyola
Guide to Voodoo