Opinion: Donald Trump does not reflect the values of the Republican Party

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Opinion: Donald Trump does not reflect the values of the Republican Party

Liliana Wendorff holds a sign at First Ward Park during Saturday's Women's March on Charlotte, N.C., which drew at least 10,000 people according to CMPD. The mile-long march was scheduled to coincide with a national demonstration Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017 in Washington, D.C., the day after Donald Trump's inauguration as president. The march started at First Ward Park, traveled down Tryon Street to 4th St. to Church St. and ended at Romare Bearden Park.

Liliana Wendorff holds a sign at First Ward Park during Saturday's Women's March on Charlotte, N.C., which drew at least 10,000 people according to CMPD. The mile-long march was scheduled to coincide with a national demonstration Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017 in Washington, D.C., the day after Donald Trump's inauguration as president. The march started at First Ward Park, traveled down Tryon Street to 4th St. to Church St. and ended at Romare Bearden Park. "The Women's March on Charlotte is a first step in uniting our communities and in empowering grassroots change," march organizers say on the march's website. "We will work peacefully to send a bold message to our elected leaders that women's rights are human rights." (Diedra Laird/The Charlotte Observer via AP)

AP

Liliana Wendorff holds a sign at First Ward Park during Saturday's Women's March on Charlotte, N.C., which drew at least 10,000 people according to CMPD. The mile-long march was scheduled to coincide with a national demonstration Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017 in Washington, D.C., the day after Donald Trump's inauguration as president. The march started at First Ward Park, traveled down Tryon Street to 4th St. to Church St. and ended at Romare Bearden Park. "The Women's March on Charlotte is a first step in uniting our communities and in empowering grassroots change," march organizers say on the march's website. "We will work peacefully to send a bold message to our elected leaders that women's rights are human rights." (Diedra Laird/The Charlotte Observer via AP)

AP

AP

Liliana Wendorff holds a sign at First Ward Park during Saturday's Women's March on Charlotte, N.C., which drew at least 10,000 people according to CMPD. The mile-long march was scheduled to coincide with a national demonstration Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017 in Washington, D.C., the day after Donald Trump's inauguration as president. The march started at First Ward Park, traveled down Tryon Street to 4th St. to Church St. and ended at Romare Bearden Park. "The Women's March on Charlotte is a first step in uniting our communities and in empowering grassroots change," march organizers say on the march's website. "We will work peacefully to send a bold message to our elected leaders that women's rights are human rights." (Diedra Laird/The Charlotte Observer via AP)


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Written by Stefson Arnold, Pres. of Loyola College Republicans, freshmen

“Make America Great Again,” was a phrase once used by two great men, both of whom led the United States economy to the highest heights it had ever reached.

Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton echoed the phrase with pride, meaning and valor. They were the epitome of what their political parties and the American people desired. In 2017, there is a new voice to those words.

While the words are exactly the same, the meaning and authenticity are ambiguous and condescending.

There are three things President Trump is not, no matter how hard he tries. Trump is not Ronald Reagan, he is definitely not Bill Clinton and he is absolutely not a Republican.

Repeatedly, Donald Trump has flipped, danced and somersaulted on key issues the GOP hold dear, leaving the Republican Party in disarray. After nearly 50 years of supporting the Democratic Party, Trump started sounding like a Republican presidential candidate. Or did he?

He started by proposing “Reagan-like” policies and even used the same slogan as Reagan. He could have fooled us all if he had stayed on message, but instead he had to show his true colors by using offensive rhetoric and degrading tweets to convey a two-year-long series
of contradictions.

At one point in the campaign, the Wall Street Journal wrote, “President-elect Trump has reshaped what it means to be Republican.”

Really? Has one man really reshaped a party which held most of the same values for 162 years? No, he has not.

Trump has created a platform appeasing a majority of the parties needs, but hanging in the balance are issues that just don’t add up and decades of conflicting statements.

He is not a Republican. He is a phony who has used the Republican Party and American people as a stepping stone to the nation’s highest office by playing along as a conservative.

Yes, many issues voiced by Trump are truly republican ideals, but some are also radical and dangerous. Tariffs, really? Trump would be the first president since the Great Depression to actually promote the express use of tariffs.

The Republican Party did not see Trump as the epitome of their party like Reagan in 1980; the politicians were just being selfish politicians. They adopted Trump’s platform as their own, not because it would be better for the American people, but instead so when the time came, their job would be secure. As one can see, many of Trump’s cabinet picks are politicians or CEOs who gave him unending support throughout
his campaign.

Donald Trump is not a Republican, but he is our president. A vote was held in accordance with over 200 years of history and we as citizens of this constitutional republic must uphold faithfully its traditions and values.

Protest is a beautiful symbol of resistance and truly is a powerful tool within our arsenal as citizens, but we must be at peace with what is done. In November, I cast my vote for the principles of the Republican Party, not Donald Trump. I cast my vote in hope that President Trump, even though a phony, will truly honor his pledge to use the values and beliefs of the Republican Party to resuscitate the American Dream. As I see citizens all around the nation chanting “not my president,” I realize that the is in fact my president, but he does not represent the values of my party.

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