The Maroon

Praise and fear surround Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination

In+this+Aug.+7%2C+2018%2C+photo%2C+President+Donald+Trump%27s+Supreme+Court+nominee%2C+Judge+Brett+Kavanaugh%2C+officiates+at+the+swearing-in+of+Judge+Britt+Grant+to+take+a+seat+on+the+U.S.+Court+of+Appeals+for+the+Eleventh+Circuit+at+the+U.S.+District+Courthouse+in+Washington.+Kavanaugh+has+expressed+concern+about+federal+agencies+running+amok.+But+his+view+that+they+should+adhere+strictly+to+laws+passed+by+Congress+worries+liberals.++%28AP+Photo%2FJ.+Scott+Applewhite%29
In this Aug. 7, 2018, photo, President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, officiates at the swearing-in of Judge Britt Grant to take a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit at the U.S. District Courthouse in Washington. Kavanaugh has expressed concern about federal agencies running amok. But his view that they should adhere strictly to laws passed by Congress worries liberals.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

In this Aug. 7, 2018, photo, President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, officiates at the swearing-in of Judge Britt Grant to take a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit at the U.S. District Courthouse in Washington. Kavanaugh has expressed concern about federal agencies running amok. But his view that they should adhere strictly to laws passed by Congress worries liberals. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

AP

AP

In this Aug. 7, 2018, photo, President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, officiates at the swearing-in of Judge Britt Grant to take a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit at the U.S. District Courthouse in Washington. Kavanaugh has expressed concern about federal agencies running amok. But his view that they should adhere strictly to laws passed by Congress worries liberals. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Kyree Magee

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On July 9, President Trump nominated Judge Brett Kavanaugh to replace retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court, a move which further divides the country politically and ideologically.

A graduate of Yale Law School, Kavanaugh pledged to “interpret the constitution as written, informed by history and tradition and precedent,” during his nomination announcement.

Kavanaugh began his career as a law clerk eventually serving under Justice Kennedy. Kavanaugh’s other notable work includes his contributions to the Starr Report, the investigation that eventually led to President Clinton’s impeachment. Along with that, Kavanaugh was President George W. Bush’s staff secretary and later served on the D.C. Appeals Court under Bush’s administration. During this time, he sealed his reputation as a right-leaning jurist.

During the announcement of Kavanaugh’s nomination, Trump complimented the 53-year-old judge, calling him a “judge’s judge” and “one of the sharpest legal minds of our time.”

In a press release, House Majority Whip Steve Scales complimented Trump and his ability to “uphold the constitution and laws of the country,” along with his choice of Kavanaugh for the position.

“There is no question Judge Kavanaugh is incredibly qualified and deserving of sitting on our nation’s highest court,” Scalise said.

Louisiana Senator Bill Cassidy also expressed satisfaction over Kavanaugh’s nomination, describing President Trump’s selection of Kavanaugh as a “solid pick,” in a video statement.

“President Trump kept his promise, nominating a conservative faithful to the Constitution as written, recognized as having an excellent legal mind,” said Cassidy.

Although Kavanagh may be held in high esteem by conservative political leaders, many on the left show concern over what Kavanaugh’s confirmation would cause for the country.

In a press release, Democratic National Committee Chair Tom Perez said that Kavanaugh is a risk and his confirmation would diminish the already battered democratic ideals.

Perez warns that Kavanaugh’s confirmation could mean more restrictions on abortion and that precedents set by Roe v. Wade may be abandoned. Kavanaugh firmly dissented against the majority ruling in a case involving an immigrant teen that needed an abortion, which Perez says “upheld the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act’s birth control benefit.”

Kavanaugh’s dissent signals how he may rule in the future on issues regarding women’s health decisions. In a video released by the DNC, the Affordable Care Act could be under attack, in general, if Kavanaugh is confirmed as he has stated that a “future president could refuse to enforce The Affordable Care Act, even if it was upheld by the Supreme Court.”

“Majority of Americans support Roe v. Wade and want to protect the Affordable Care Act,” said Perez, “so President Trump and Judge Kavanaugh don’t just stand in opposition to democratic principles, they stand against the American people.”

Due to the ongoing investigation into President Trump, Kavanaugh’s views on the expansion of executive power are relevant to future changes within our government as well. Kavanaugh stated that Congress should pass a law that protects the sitting president from civil suits, according to his 2009 article.

“Trump is attempting to turn our highest judicial institution into a rubber stamp for right-wing Republican ideology,” said Perez.

According to the DNC, Kavanaugh’s nomination poses a threat to women’s rights, civil rights, and voting rights. Perez said Kavanaugh’s confirmation would further alienate already marginalized groups from the government and its decisions, including immigrants, the LGBTQ+ community, African Americans, and those with disabilities. Perez also vocalized that Kavanaugh’s nomination would likely propel wealthy corporations, widening the social and economic divide. Essentially, Kavanaugh’s confirmation would be detrimental to valued rights that a majority of Americans enjoy and would only further the political divide that was heightened during Trump’s election.

“Our Supreme Court must always protect people’s constitutional rights and serve as a check on the powers of the executive branch,” said Perez.

Kavanaugh’s nomination will continue to be discussed and debated as the very important midterm election for both parties this fall rapidly approaches.

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Praise and fear surround Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination