The Maroon

Ear protection rings true for Loyola musicians

Allison+Hasson+plays+the+flute+during+her+rehearsal+at+Loyola+on+March+8%2C+2018.+Hasson+plays+with+earplugs+at+each+rehearsal.+ANNA+KNAPP%2FThe+Maroon.+Photo+credit%3A+Anna+Knapp
Allison Hasson plays the flute during her rehearsal at Loyola on March 8, 2018. Hasson plays with earplugs at each rehearsal. ANNA KNAPP/The Maroon. Photo credit: Anna Knapp

Allison Hasson plays the flute during her rehearsal at Loyola on March 8, 2018. Hasson plays with earplugs at each rehearsal. ANNA KNAPP/The Maroon. Photo credit: Anna Knapp

Allison Hasson plays the flute during her rehearsal at Loyola on March 8, 2018. Hasson plays with earplugs at each rehearsal. ANNA KNAPP/The Maroon. Photo credit: Anna Knapp

Anna Knapp

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Researchers have known for years that loud music can damage your hearing, and a Loyola student is taking her health into her own hands.

Music senior Allison Hasson has been playing the flute for years, but hearing the sweet sounds are getting more difficult. She is sensitive to sound and can barely hear low voices.

For Hasson, further sensitivity to sound and hearing loss would mean the loss of her passion.

“My whole sound life flashed before my eyes, and I realized I could possibly have permanent hearing loss,” Hasson said.

While rehearsing, Hasson uses an app to measure the sound decibels of her instrument. Recently, the app maxed out for more than five minutes, meaning potential permanent hearing loss.

A study by German researchers found that working musicians topped the charts for hearing loss. Yielding similar results, a study at the University of Bremen said that musicians are four times more likely to suffer from noise induced hearing loss than non-musicians.

Serena Weren, professor of music, urges students like Hasson to protect their ears and wear earplugs.

“When you consider that sound protection and your ears are one of your most valuable senses and are required to be a musician, that’s something that’s worth protecting,” Weren said.

Hasson and many other students now wear earplugs every rehearsal.

“I want to be able to hear music,” said Hasson.

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Ear protection rings true for Loyola musicians