Review: “Sextuplets” is one of the worst things on Netflix

Courtesy+of+Netflix.
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Review: “Sextuplets” is one of the worst things on Netflix

Courtesy of Netflix.

Courtesy of Netflix.

Courtesy of Netflix.

Courtesy of Netflix.

Cody Downey

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“Sextuplets” was an absolute waste of my time. I hoped for at least an enjoyable time and was left with nothing to show for it. But, I’m sure you are wondering how a movie could be as bad as I say.

Family comedies are commonplace in the world of film but Marlon Wayans’ latest film takes the concept to Netflix.

The plot of this film follows Alan, played by Wayans, as he waits on the birth of his first child with his wife Marie, played by Bresha Webb. However, Alan is worried if he will be able to start a family due to growing up in a state home without a real family. With the help of his father-in-law judge, played by Glynn Turman, Alan receives his birth certificate and finds out who is mother is. He shows up to his mother’s house only to find out from his “twin” brother Russell, also played by Wayans, that she has died. Upon searching through the house, Alan discovers a newspaper article revealing that Russell is only one of his five siblings, making him a sextuplet. With this information, Alan and Russell go on a road trip to find their long-lost siblings and become a family.

The main comedic gimmick of “Sextuplets” is that Marlon Wayans portrays every one of his siblings, including the female one. It is sad to see that no one informed Wayans that this type of comedy is no longer funny, if it even ever was. It is reminiscent of Eddie Murphy’s “The Nutty Professor” movies and Tyler Perry’s “Madea” movies. Say what you will about this brand of humor, but no one will debate that this film does it incorrectly.

With each sibling Wayans plays, a new stereotype of a character is introduced. Russell is an overweight nerd with a love of old 80s television shows. Dawn, the only female of the sextuple, is a collection of every “ghetto” stereotype rolled into one with her distinctive character traits being yelling and threatening to cut someone. Ethan is a business owner turned criminal who tries to steal Alan’s identity and is also described as talking like a “70s pimp.” Baby Pete, which is not a nickname, but his actual birth name, is a medical patient who is suffering with infantile paralysis. Finally, we have Jasper, a psycho maniac who was teased throughout his life for being a black man with extremely white skin and red hair.

The problem with these characters is that they aren’t believable. Aside from their obvious stereotypes, there isn’t a moment where you will believe it isn’t just Marlon Wayans in a costume putting on a voice. The film even pulls the old joke of characters saying, “We look just alike.” However, “Sextuplets” never seems to realize that this joke falls flat for the reason above. The joke could’ve been funny if the siblings were actually played by different actors who look nothing like Wayans.

Possibly the most aggravating parts of this film are how the characters get away with everything. Over the course of “Sextuplets,” Alan pays for his sister’s $10,000 bail to get out of prison, has his car rammed by a bull, gets his nose broken, has his kidney surgically taken without his consent, almost has his identity stolen, almost misses the birth of his child and discovers that his mother wasn’t dead all along. Oh wait. Did I forget to give a spoiler warning? Oh well. Anyways, Alan is subjected to all these things that either cost him financially, physically or emotionally. Do his siblings ever apologize for this? No. They get away with all their actions and face no consequences.

Despite all of my complaining, I must sadly admit I committed the greatest atrocity of them all while watching this film: chuckling. Though many of the jokes fall on their faces, some lines did get a small laugh from me. Due not to actual humor but to the brain cells that recognize humor dying over the hour and 40-minute runtime.

The next time you are on Netflix please do me a personal favor. Immediately, find “Sextuplets” and give it a down vote so Netflix will no longer put their money toward garbage like this anymore.

Rating: 2 out of 10

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