Deaux is a neaux geaux

The+space+that+once+housed+the+on-campus+pizza+restaurant%2C+Deaux%2C+sits+outside+Carrollton+Hall.+The+space+will+soon+become+a+community+kitchen.+Photo+credit%3A+Cristian+Orellana
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Deaux is a neaux geaux

The space that once housed the on-campus pizza restaurant, Deaux, sits outside Carrollton Hall. The space will soon become a community kitchen. Photo credit: Cristian Orellana

The space that once housed the on-campus pizza restaurant, Deaux, sits outside Carrollton Hall. The space will soon become a community kitchen. Photo credit: Cristian Orellana

The space that once housed the on-campus pizza restaurant, Deaux, sits outside Carrollton Hall. The space will soon become a community kitchen. Photo credit: Cristian Orellana

The space that once housed the on-campus pizza restaurant, Deaux, sits outside Carrollton Hall. The space will soon become a community kitchen. Photo credit: Cristian Orellana

Emma Ruby

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Dust has begun to collect on the windows of what was once a notorious hot spot for inebriated students in search of a slice.

Deaux Pizza, the restaurant that once existed near the Carrollton Hall turnaround, did not return to campus this year, according to Director of Residential Life Amy Boyle.

Last year, the university surveyed students about what type of dining option they would like to replace Deaux. Campus buzzed with rumors of a new restaurant over the summer, but the future of the diner is different from what many expected.

The space, that previously served late-night cheesy bread and pizzas, will now be turned into a “multipurpose room,” which will include a community kitchen for all students, Boyle said in an Aug. 26 email to students.

As of publication, Boyle did not respond to further questions about the reason for Deaux’s disappearance, nor did she address the logistics of how a campus-wide community kitchen would operate.

The kitchen, which is set to open mid-September according to Boyle, has drawn some skepticism from students.

“I don’t think I’m going to miss the pizza itself, but they could’ve done something better with the space,” Jennifer Torres, economics sophomore, said.

“Who is going to walk all the way over to cook stuff, and who is going to clean? Because it’s not like they’ve cleaned before. Remember the kitchens in Biever? That was disgusting.”

For Madison Taylor, marketing senior, the loss of Deaux is a loss for all students.

“Freshman year, it was a beautiful safe space for me to go at 1 a.m. when I didn’t want to spend real money on drunk food,” Taylor said. “Everyone deserved to experience a s—– drunk Deaux pizza.”

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