Tuck’s gone but not forgotten

The+door+opens+to+Friar+Tuck%E2%80%99s+Bar+%26+Grill+on+Freret+Street+Wednesday+Dec.+1%2C+2010.+The+establishment+was+shut+down+last+January%2C+forcing+students+to+migrate+to+different+bars+in+the+Uptown+area.+
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Tuck’s gone but not forgotten

The door opens to Friar Tuck’s Bar & Grill on Freret Street Wednesday Dec. 1, 2010. The establishment was shut down last January, forcing students to migrate to different bars in the Uptown area.

The door opens to Friar Tuck’s Bar & Grill on Freret Street Wednesday Dec. 1, 2010. The establishment was shut down last January, forcing students to migrate to different bars in the Uptown area.

File Photo/The Maroon

The door opens to Friar Tuck’s Bar & Grill on Freret Street Wednesday Dec. 1, 2010. The establishment was shut down last January, forcing students to migrate to different bars in the Uptown area.

File Photo/The Maroon

File Photo/The Maroon

The door opens to Friar Tuck’s Bar & Grill on Freret Street Wednesday Dec. 1, 2010. The establishment was shut down last January, forcing students to migrate to different bars in the Uptown area.

SHANNON DONALDSON Staff Writer

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Just over a year ago, Christiana Van Bree, political science and mass communication sophomore, was in her room getting ready to go to Friar Tuck’s Bar and Grill when she heard that the bar had been closed for the night.

The reason, Van Bree would later find out, was that 19-year-old Errol Joseph Meeks had been shot and killed right outside of the establishment. Tuck’s owner Jason Blitch voluntarily closed down the bar immediately following the Jan. 18 incident.

“We heard that something had happened at Tuck’s, so we turned around and went to The Boot. Little did we know that would be the last time we’d go to Tuck’s,” Van Bree said.

Tuck’s was known and loved among Loyola students for its close proximity to campus and the ease in which underage customers could purchase alcohol. For many, Tuck’s was the setting of many a memory from freshman year.

“What I miss most about Tuck’s is the community aspect; it was small and conducive to conversation. Even just walking over to Tuck’s with your friends was always fun. And I mean, you can’t top Ladies’ Night,” said Sarah Scalese, psychology sophomore.

Now, a year after Tuck’s closing, Loyola students have to venture further away from the Uptown staple, even if that means simply going to other university area bars within walking distance. Bars such as The Boot, The Doors Pub & Pizza, The Palms and The Frat House have taken in the old Tuck’s crowd.

According to Kelly O’Leary, Loyola graduate and manager at The Doors on Maple Street, the closing of Tuck’s was a game changer.

“When Tuck’s closed, it kind of left us with a lot of people that would not have normally come to Maple, so I guess you could say that brought more business to Maple,” O’Leary said.

Van Bree said she started to go to other bars.

“The Frat House became more popular, and The Boot pretty much stayed the same popularity-wise. I feel like I extended the range of bars I go to now. I go to The Columns more now and downtown events,” Van Bree said.

Keeping with the Tuck’s tradition of having Ladies’ Night every Wednesday night, The Frat House has easily been able to draw in customers. But it has its drawbacks. The Frat House now charges for Ladies’ Night as opposed to Tuck’s, which never charged.

“We all felt lost for a little bit (when Tuck’s closed), and I feel like it still hasn’t been replaced. The Frat House just isn’t the same. If there was a mix between the Frat House and The Doors, that would maybe come close, but it wouldn’t be as fun as Tuck’s was,” Scalese said.

The outlook is still bright, though. Much like the old Tuck’s building moves into a new phase with the opening of Origami Sushi, Loyola students have moved on to a new phase in their nightlife habits.

“It has broadened my horizons for going out, but there will always be a special place in my heart for Tuck’s,” Van Bree said.

Shannon Donaldson can be reached at [email protected] 

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