Column: Uptown offers variety of food options for students

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Column: Uptown offers variety of food options for students

A Bearcat Cafe line cook prepares a meal. Bearcat Cafe serves American, Cajun and Creole food. Photo credit: Michael Bauer

A Bearcat Cafe line cook prepares a meal. Bearcat Cafe serves American, Cajun and Creole food. Photo credit: Michael Bauer

Michael Bauer

A Bearcat Cafe line cook prepares a meal. Bearcat Cafe serves American, Cajun and Creole food. Photo credit: Michael Bauer

Michael Bauer

Michael Bauer

A Bearcat Cafe line cook prepares a meal. Bearcat Cafe serves American, Cajun and Creole food. Photo credit: Michael Bauer

Francesca Du Broca

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With the 2019 fall semester in full swing, Loyola students have the opportunity to explore myriad local restaurants near campus for the ultimate New Orleans food experience. Whether discovering new locations or returning to a local favorite, the restaurant culture in New Orleans has something for everyone.

A plethora of close-to-campus restaurants offer moderate prices and cater to students on any schedule. The restaurants are within walking distance or a brief streetcar ride from campus.

Bearcat Cafe

First on the uptown restaurant tour is a modern styled brunch spot: Bearcat Cafe. The cafe, which is located a mile off of the main campus on Jena Street, opens at 7 a.m. This brunch spot features an array of options, with menu prices hovering between eight and 15 dollars. The restaurant boasts an assortment of American, Cajun and Creole dishes to go along with coffee and bottled teas.

Jamila’s Cafe

Next on the tour is an upscale yet casual dining experience that students can enjoy during dinner hours: Jamila’s Cafe. Located on Maple Street, this Tunisian-style restaurant offers a blend of Mediterranean and Creole dishes, with an authentic Moroccan belly dance performance during the weekend. Jamila’s popular dishes include the lamb chop, eggplant salad, the daily grilled fish special and bisque. Students dining here can expect to pay between 11 and 30 dollars an entree.

Ba Chi Canteen

Next up on the list is a place for students who are looking for an authentic Vietnamese restaurant nearby. Less than a mile from the main campus, Ba Chi Canteen promises a traditional Vietnamese noodle house. Located on Maple Street, the restaurant opens for lunch at 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and then again at 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. for dinner. Some of the popular items include the Lemongrass Tofu Pho bowls like the Lemongrass tofu, “bacos” tacos and an assortment of vegetarian options.

Piccola Galetaria

For the final destination on the list, it is only natural to introduce a dessert shop. With the August heat ramping up, you might want to beat the humidity with a cool and sweet stop at the next location: Piccola Gelataria. This Italian gelato shop located at 4525 Freret Street, also specializes in crepes and espresso coffee. Be sure to stop in from 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. throughout the week. Piccola is open until 10 p.m on the weekend and closed on Mondays. Each gelato is hand-crafted for each customer.

New Orleans is a foodie’s city. The Big Easy is known for an array of unique and diverse restaurants throughout the city that feature a multitude of varying menus to fit any pallet on any given day of the week. Loyola students need not look far to start tasting the city.

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Piccola Gelataria, located on Freret street, serves handcrafted concoctions for each customer. Photo credit: Michael Bauer

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From left to right, Chris Luckett, popular commercial music senior, Az Troenkrasnow, accounting junior and Mike Natale, music industry senior, enjoy a meal at Ba Chi Canteen. Ba Chi Canteen serves Vietnamese food. Photo credit: Michael Bauer

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Jamila’s Cafe is located on Maple Street. Photo credit: Michael Bauer

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