The Maroon

St. Joseph Cemetery breathes life

A+large+assortment+of+flowers+are+laid+at+the+grave+of+Wallace+Marquet.++Several+graves+had+flowers+to+help+remember+passed+loved+ones.+ANDRES+FUENTES%2FThe+Maroon.
Back to Article
Back to Article

St. Joseph Cemetery breathes life

A large assortment of flowers are laid at the grave of Wallace Marquet.  Several graves had flowers to help remember passed loved ones. ANDRES FUENTES/The Maroon.

A large assortment of flowers are laid at the grave of Wallace Marquet. Several graves had flowers to help remember passed loved ones. ANDRES FUENTES/The Maroon.

Andres Fuentes

A large assortment of flowers are laid at the grave of Wallace Marquet. Several graves had flowers to help remember passed loved ones. ANDRES FUENTES/The Maroon.

Andres Fuentes

Andres Fuentes

A large assortment of flowers are laid at the grave of Wallace Marquet. Several graves had flowers to help remember passed loved ones. ANDRES FUENTES/The Maroon.

Andres Fuentes

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Gated off by a rusty chain link fence, St. Joseph Cemetery No. 1 is one that most central city residents pass by on their morning commute.

It’s not green and lush like other cemeteries, or filled with grand histories and stories. Instead, it’s wedged in the heart of homes and families, bordering Washington Avenue.

Tours don’t pass through, and the dead seldom get visitors. The sidewalks are cracked and weeds stretch out toward the sun.

But don’t be fooled, there are stories to find deep inside. There are flowers to see and monuments to admire.

Marble, stone and brick line the plots and mausoleums and statues of angels. Jesus Christ and the Virgin Mary line the roofs of the homes of the deceased.

There are tales of WWII veterans and policemen, either dying in the line of duty or years later among friends and families.

There are generations upon generations joined together in crypts.

St. Joseph Cemetery tells stories dating all the way back to 1854, and although the dead can’t admire a bouquet of lilies, roses or carnations, the graves are blooming with bundles of flowers on any given Spring afternoon.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
About the Contributor
Andres Fuentes, Sports Editor

Andres is going onto his third year with The Maroon, and has previously served as Sports Editor, Sports Assistant and Distribution Manager. He hopes that...

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Life & Times

    05/03/19 Puzzle Answers

  • Life & Times

    Review: ‘Avengers: Endgame’ provides a satisfying experience for longtime fans (spoilers)

  • St. Joseph Cemetery breathes life

    Life & Times

    HOLoyno: Who is Kahn?

  • St. Joseph Cemetery breathes life

    Life & Times

    Readers are shelving their Kindles in favor of local book stores

  • St. Joseph Cemetery breathes life

    Life & Times

    Review: Netflix’s ‘Love, Death and Robots’ is a burst of creativity

  • St. Joseph Cemetery breathes life

    Life & Times

    HOLoyno: Who is Henne?

  • Life & Times

    4/26/19 Puzzle Answers

  • St. Joseph Cemetery breathes life

    Leisure

    Column: The French Quarter Fest celebrates everything New Orleans

  • St. Joseph Cemetery breathes life

    Life & Times

    Trash to Treasure: Audubon Aquarium aims to teach about ocean pollution with art

  • St. Joseph Cemetery breathes life

    Life & Times

    Review: ‘On My Block’ perfectly mixes comedy and drama

Navigate Right
Since 1923 • For a greater Loyola
St. Joseph Cemetery breathes life