HOLoyno: Who is Henne?

Nathan C. Henne, Latin American Studies and Spanish professor, poses in the Loyola University horseshoe. HOLoyno is a project by Sofia Santoro, psychology sophomore that highlights the creativity and diversity across Loyola's campus.

Sofia Santoro

Nathan C. Henne, Latin American Studies and Spanish professor, poses in the Loyola University horseshoe. HOLoyno is a project by Sofia Santoro, psychology sophomore that highlights the creativity and diversity across Loyola's campus.

Sofia Santoro

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Inspired by the Humans of New York series, often shortened to HONY, psychology sophomore Sofia Santoro started an experimental project that involved taking portraits of professors, followed by a brief interview. This project became HOLoyno.

All portraits were shot around campus on a canon film camera in color. With HOLoyno, Santoro hopes to highlight the creativity and diversity across Loyola’s campus, in an intimate and personal way.

Originally from Guatemala, Nathan C. Henne, Latin American Studies and Spanish professor, attended grad school in California. Falling under the astrological sign of Pisces, it’s no surprise that Henne turned to surfing as a way to wash away his stress.

“The great thing about surfing is you could be in the middle of a huge city and you go out, be on your board, and just turn around the other way,” said Henne. “There’s nothing there…It’s the rhythm of the water, the waves, that takes you out of the rhythm of this civilization.”

Henne got a job teaching at Loyola 12 years ago right after he finished getting his Ph.D. The moments that pay off for him are the “eureka” awakenings. The little moments when he sees that he gets through to someone to help them think in a different way.

“I’m so lucky. I really, really, really love my job. And I don’t know how many people can say that.”

If he were to be anything other than a professor, Henne said he would want to be an astronaut.

“I think that having the perspective, huge perspective, change from that in physical way is a similar way that I try to do in my classes. We’ll look at something from a different angle than you have before,” said Henne.

“Can you imagine seeing the Earth? Not seeing the Earth, like a picture. But seeing the Earth as this thing that you always knew.”

000279520006.jpg

Henne is a Latin American Studies and Spanish professor who attended grad school in California. Photo credit: Sofia Santoro

Print Friendly, PDF & Email