The Maroon

Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

Here+is+an+example+of+the+airtight+interference+given+Buck+Moore+on+his+long+runs.+Much+praise+has+been+showered+on+Buck+for+the+manner+in+which+he+has+broken+loose+in+every+game+for+sensational+dashes%2C+and+just+as+much+is+due+his+interferers.+The+photo%2C+snapped+during+the+Lincoln+game%2C+shows+Charlie+Jaubert+at+the+extreme+left%2C+Don+Maitland+next+behind+him%2C+and+Red+Gremillion+in+front+of+Moore.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

Here is an example of the airtight interference given Buck Moore on his long runs. Much praise has been showered on Buck for the manner in which he has broken loose in every game for sensational dashes, and just as much is due his interferers. The photo, snapped during the Lincoln game, shows Charlie Jaubert at the extreme left, Don Maitland next behind him, and Red Gremillion in front of Moore.

Here is an example of the airtight interference given Buck Moore on his long runs. Much praise has been showered on Buck for the manner in which he has broken loose in every game for sensational dashes, and just as much is due his interferers. The photo, snapped during the Lincoln game, shows Charlie Jaubert at the extreme left, Don Maitland next behind him, and Red Gremillion in front of Moore.

Here is an example of the airtight interference given Buck Moore on his long runs. Much praise has been showered on Buck for the manner in which he has broken loose in every game for sensational dashes, and just as much is due his interferers. The photo, snapped during the Lincoln game, shows Charlie Jaubert at the extreme left, Don Maitland next behind him, and Red Gremillion in front of Moore.

Here is an example of the airtight interference given Buck Moore on his long runs. Much praise has been showered on Buck for the manner in which he has broken loose in every game for sensational dashes, and just as much is due his interferers. The photo, snapped during the Lincoln game, shows Charlie Jaubert at the extreme left, Don Maitland next behind him, and Red Gremillion in front of Moore.


Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






This article was written by The Maroon staff on Dec. 3 1926

Led by their brilliant captain A.D. Smith for the last time, the Loyola Wolves on Saturday November 27 made it ten in a row by defeating the Loyola of Chicago Ramblers, 40 to 14.

Some nine or ten thousand fans turned out to see the Wolves overtake Lafayette as the highest scoring team in the country. Three hundred and fifty-five points was the Wolf total, bettering the Lafayette score by 25 points. The game was not as one-sided as the score seemed to indicate for the teams played evenly with Loyola taking advantage of every opportunity.

The first touchdown came soon after the opening kick-off. After an exchange of punts, Lawless of Chicago fumbled and Bill Ritchey, Wolf guard, recovered the ball on the Chicago seven-yard line. A two-yard buck at right guard and a three-yard thrust off right tackle by Maitland moved the oval up to the two-yard line, from which Gremillion crashed through center for a touchdown. Moore added a point when he drop-kicked the goal.

Taking the kick-off after this touch down on the 43-yard line, the Wolves, with Gremillion, Moore and Maitland carrying the ball, moved the oval to the 19-yard line. Here Buck Moore got loose around right end for 19 yards and a touchdown, but he missed his try for point.

Ritchey’s touchdown came next. Chicago took the kickoff on their three-yard line and from there marched down the field in quick order. Griffin fumbled and Bill Ritchey picked up the loose ball and ran 20 yards for a touchdown. A pass from Moore to Palm failed to make the extra point.

That was all the scoring that was done in the first period of play, but the Loyola Wolves put up fourteen more points on the score board in the second quarter. Coach Eddie Reid used his second string men in the game during the third period, but although they held the Ramblers scoreless, the Wolves worked the ball down and over the Chicago goal line. Chicago made their second touchdown in the same quarter on a sustained drive from their five yard line.

Red Gremillion was the outstanding offensive player of the game. He crashed the Chicago line time and again for considerable yardage and four times crossed the Chicago goal line for touchdowns. He was closely seconded by Don Maitland. Gremillion also did some great line bucking, and they were prominent in the advances made by the Wolves. Bucky Moore scored one of the New Orleans touchdowns on a 19-yard run, his longest gaining run of the game, but not his longest dash. His best sprint was for thirty-five yards and was called back because of an offsides penalty to the Wolves. Moore carried the ball only 15 times in the game and each time made a good gain, though he did not get away for any sensational runs. In the line of work of Captain Smith, Bill Ritchey, Charlie Cotten, Clarence Palm and Ray Drouilhet was brilliant. Ritchey did the best work of the quintet, however. He recovered two Chicago fumbles and got several tackles at critical moments.

Lawless, Downs, Griffin, Witry and Lundgoot were the stand out performers for Chicago. Lawless and Griffin did some neat line plunging while Witry’s defensive game was great. The passing of Johnson and Lundgoot was well done and brilliant. So was the receiving of Lawless, Griffin and others. The forward passing of the visitors was their biggest threat and they gained most of their yardage by the air line route. However, they made some nice gains from line plays which were made from deceptive formations and aided by fine interference.

Straight football, coupled with the consistent end runs of Moore, was what gained all of the yardage for Loyola of New Orleans. A few passes were tried but none were completed for appreciable games.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

    Sports

    Column: How I survive as a native surfer in NOLA

  • Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

    Op/Ed

    Opinion: I am proud to be the daughter of immigrants

  • Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

    Op/Ed

    Opinion: This is where I think the campus stands

  • Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

    Op/Ed

    For the greatest Loyola

  • Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

    Basketball

    Loyola knocks Dillard out The Den

  • Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

    Cheer and Dance

    Loyola dancer brings Caribbean ties to dance team

  • Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

    National

    Loyola students offer mixed reviews on FDA’s JUUL ban

  • Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

    News

    Lemon Pepper hopes to add flavor to post-grad life for students of color

  • Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

    Uptown Howl

    Uptown Howl Season 3 – Episode 16

  • Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14

    Christianity

    Eight former Loyola priests named in Jesuit sex abuse list

Navigate Right
Since 1923 • For a greater Loyola
Dec. 3, 1926: Wolf Pack defeats Chicago Ramblers by score of 40-14