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Some students unhappy with one voice

Despite differences in student beliefs, there remains no endorsed abortion rights club on campus

Assistant News Editor

Published: Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Updated: Thursday, December 6, 2012 18:12

As student organizations discussed women’s reproductive rights at a panel last month, one organization was left out—an abortion rights club.

Last year, though, two seniors proposed an abortion rights club, Voices for Choices, but Student Government Association denied the charter.

“We thought that since Loyola is an institution of higher learning that they would be open minded to having both sides of the coin represented. Apparently we were wrong,” said Ashley Nesbitt, A’11, who, along with Tori Buckley, A’11, spearheaded the idea of an abortion rights group.

According to Michael Morin, SGA president and music education senior, the charter was denied because it is incompatible with the mission, goals and values of the university.

“As a Jesuit Catholic university, we adopt the teachings and beliefs of the church, and on the topic of life, we (the university) are pro-life,” he said. “After the organization was denied in the SGA court, they appealed directly to the Office of Student Affairs, which supported the decision of the court to deny them recognition as an official organization.”

All student organizations must adhere to the university’s mission for their charter to be approved by SGA and the Office of Student Affairs, according to the SGA handbook.

Nesbitt and Buckley were not alone when proposing a charter of Voices for Choices. A petition of 259 signatures supported Voices for Choices and an abortion rights voice on campus.

The club was intended to be a place for students to get information and support about pregnancy, birth control, adoption and sexual health, not just about if abortion is right or wrong, Nesbitt said. Nesbitt and Buckley said they felt having only an anti-abortion club did not do the members of Loyola justice.

Some of the 259 signatures included Loyola Life members, according to Nesbitt, and Kylee McIntyre, English sophomore and vice president of Loyola Life. According to Office of Co-Curricular Programs website, Loyola Life promotes life in all stages from conception to natural death, which includes poverty, the death penalty and euthanasia.

But not all of Loyola Life was on board with Voices for Choices. According to McIntyre most Loyola Life members are opposed to an abortion rights club on campus. McIntyre said that even though they are opposed to an abortion rights club, Loyola Life is open and willing to discuss the issue.

Loyola Life members participated in a panel discussion about women’s reproductive rights late last month held by the Loyola University Sociology Student Organization.

Alyssa Patterson, sociology senior and president of the sociology organization, said the panel gave the possibility of dialogue of both sides when only an anti-abortion voice is endorsed on campus.

Patterson said the panel opened discussion about anti-abortion and abortion rights. There was a good turnout of students and faculty who represented both sides of the issue, including some Loyola Life members. Although it was just a conversation, it was an important step for women’s rights and resources on a Jesuit campus, Patterson said.

Yet discussion about abortion rights may not be enough. Some students said they want Loyola to provide resources, support and awareness for women who must make difficult life decisions

Student Advocates for Gender Equality members said they would support an abortion rights club on campus.

Maddie Crabtree, jazz studies sophomore and member of the gender equality group, said she believes the university views abortion rights as promoting abortion. This misses the big picture about abortion rights, according to Crabtree.

“Pro choice is not pro abortion, it is a choice,” Crabtree said.

Nesbitt said the club was meant to provide support, compassion and awareness about difficult life decisions like abortion.

Jamie Futral can be reached at jafutral@loyno.edu

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9 comments Log in to Comment

Sandra Fluke
Tue Feb 5 2013 01:54
WTF! Women "deserve" to murder their child? What if the father WANTS it? Aren't feminists shooting for equality? So why are they silencing men? And no, women should not have their slutting around paid by taxpayers. Women should pay for their own birth control and abortions (if they become legalized) and not take handouts. Liberals need to grow up and see what's really going on.

BTW, Anonymous: "Women 's rights is a cover for the hatred woman have for men. It has really nothing to do with right.

For the record, I am a woman. "

More women need to wake up like you. Feminism doesn't benefit ANYONE.

Anonymous
Sun Feb 3 2013 15:13
Go Loyola!!!!
P. H.
Fri Feb 1 2013 16:56
Not a student of this university. I do have a former high school student of mine there. I just have to say that I am pro-life. There has been to many abortions since RoevsWade. I am only in favor for those who were raped, incest and if the mother's life is in grave danger.
Anonymous
Wed Nov 23 2011 21:58
Women 's rights is a cover for the hatred woman have for men. It has really nothing to do with right.

For the record, I am a woman.

Anonymous
Tue Nov 22 2011 10:20
"Pro choice is not pro abortion, it is a choice"

This writer would have to also agree that the Confederacy was not pro-slavery - only open to the choice to own slaves.

Anonymous
Mon Nov 21 2011 22:20
As an alum of Loyola I am shocked to see that the Hitle Youth do not believe Loyola is open minded. Because of their open mindness I sought a masters elsewhere.

Kudos to those who banned the pro choice femi nazis.

Anonymous
Mon Nov 21 2011 21:13
As a Loyola alumni and financial supporter, I would hesitate to support Loyola if it were to cave in into the demands of students promoting abortion. This is a Catholic University, if these students want to advocate abortion, they should look into another institution of learning.
Anonymous
Mon Nov 21 2011 18:56
It is troubling to read some of the quotes that were made by the students of the University. The students who are "pro-choice" are arguing that they don't support abortion just having options. Well in saying that you are for women having the option of abortion you are in fact for abortion. The Catholic Church, of which Loyola belongs, does not under any circumstances believe that abortion should even be considered as an option for women who are pregnant. Rather, all the other support information that they desire to have on campus can be provided by Loyola Life as long as they are in line with the values of the institution and the Church. We can't and should not have information about birth control available on campus but Loyola Life should and must be talking about adoption, sexual health and pregnancy. Loyola is a pro-choice institution in that we support women in choosing life.
Anonymous
Mon Nov 21 2011 18:35
Well, call me impressed that Loyola has not completely caved to the spirit of the times. Why would these "pro-choice" types think that a Catholic institution would give them formal recognitiion? Obviously they are free to advocate the killing of unborn children all they want, they just can't demand that their fellow students subsidize their activities with a portion of their fees, or that Loyola approbate their mission. Perhaps they were led to believe that for Loyola, that "Catholic thing" was just a PR move. I will admit that for many years, I have thought the same thing. This gives me some hope that the University will again be a beacon of fidelity to the Church's teachings and magisterium, both in what it says, and in how it acts.

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